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Poster: Jim F Date: Jun 9, 2010 11:50pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: June 9 & 10 - Taper's Gauntlet reveals an Orgy of Sound

Great post, thank you for sharing, and most of all, thanks for taping!

I've been getting so wrapped up in the flood of great "TDIH" shows lately that I totally forgot about 6/9-10/73. Instead of pulling out the sbds like I usually would, I'm going with your auds. Aside from a slight lack of drums/cymbals in the high end, these sound absolutely fantastic for a first time endeavor in 1973. And...that GAUNTLET...how you pulled that off, I have no clue. You deserve some kind of award for that.

I never liked audience recordings much until recently. I always kindof saw them as a last resort, something to listen to if no board existed for the date, or to cover patches. I would say I was probably more tolerant of more modern audience tapes, the setups some people have been using these last 10 years especially are phenomenal. But for the older stuff, I usually passed on the aud's. Only in this last year have I gained a true appreciation for them, and have actually excitedly sought them out to listen to over the boards. I think it was gaining an appreciation for a GOOD matrix that really opened the door to my new appreciation, or love even, of audience recordings. It surprises me how less rowdy a lot of crowds seemed in the 70's compared to now. Nowdays you can have a stand 12 feet up and still hear the roar of chatter during a good Stella Blue or Morning Dew. Maybe the dope back then just made people shut up and listen more lol.

Anyway, 2 questions, if you don't mind-

It seems you abandoned your gear that you used for the RFK shows after a month or two and upgraded to the Nak. Any reason? Just that excited about taping that you just had to upgrade? I imagine that stuff wasn't cheap back then.

Secondly, it continues to amaze me how the earliest tapers not only got their gear in (I've heard many stories of how that was pulled off and that doesn't surprise me as much, despite the relatively large size of the state of the art gear at the time-not including batteries and blanks-considering somewhat more relaxed security and such), but in an era where you didn't want to get spotted with a mic stand (how ya'll got THOSE in really amazes me, I mean, a 10 FOOT POLE?), how did so many tapers get away with holding a big pole in the air? Would you just lower it when security happened to pass by? Did venue/staff just overlook it?

Anyway, thanks for all the backstory on those legendary concerts. It amazes me that so many people would leave after the ABB and not stay for the Dead. I never knew that about the crowd at that show, nor did I know that so many had left before the Dead/ABB jam set. It sounds like you didn't tape the Allman's either day, but I'm amazed that you had enough cassettes with you to capture the Dead as complete as you did. I imagine over the 2 days you used quite a lot of tapes, which I've heard weren't all that cheap back then either.

You're a champ for all you did, Monte. Nothing but thanks and respect from me!

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Poster: dead-head_Monte Date: Jun 10, 2010 9:27am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: June 9 & 10 - Taper's Gauntlet reveals an Orgy of Sound

I purchased my Nakamichi 550 portable stereo cassette recorder in June, 1973. It was state-of-the-art, being the first portable stereo cassette recorder in the world to feature Dobly NR and Chromium Tape bias/EQ circuitry. This was a huge development. Tapers like myself were also making copies of other tapes. The Nak was a heavy device to haul around for taping shows. This deck weighed 11.25 pounds without batteries. It required 8 D-cell batteries to operate in the field. I believe I had the first Nakamichi 550 deck on the East Coast in 1973. I bought it from a very high-end audio dealer in NJ, named Roger Iselle. At his insistence, I had to pay him $500 cash up-front. I waited one month for my new deck to arrive. It was brand new when I taped GD at Roosevelt Stadium, July 31 and Aug 1.

The 10-foot pole "mic stand" at Roosevelt Stadium was a one-time wonder. Scaffolding rubble was piled up next to the entrance gate on July 31. I simply picked up the pole and walked inside with it. I was very surprised that no one stopped me. However, the Hell's Angels and GD security had noticed my mic on this pole. Jerry Moore was there taping that night. He didn't get busted.

Regarding the crowds exiting RFK Stadium early on June 10, it was clear to everyone there that: a) Some people were there just for the Allmans. Many of them left after ABB played first on Sunday. b) Some people were there just for the Dead. Duane Allman had died 20 months earlier, and some of us were less interested. c) Some people left early on Sunday because they had a long commute. Many people needed to get back for work on Monday. I don't think anyone in the crowd was from Wash DC. Everyone commuted there from up and down the east coast.

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